Madeline

First published in 1939, this beloved story follows a little orphan girl named Madeline on her daily adventures in Paris. The detailed illustrations and delightful rhyming is enough to keep even the youngest explorers entertained. As a parent, you’ll enjoy going along for the ride.

In an old house in Paris that was covered with vines,
lived twelve little girls in two straight lines
They left the house, at half past nine…
The smallest one was Madeline. 

The very first book is a great place to begin your Parisian adventure. But while we prefer the original series, authored by Ludwig Bemelmans, his grandson John Bemelmans Marciano has carried on the Madeline legacy with newer adventures to Rome and the White House, among others! Discover them all in our travel library »

About the Author

Ludwig Bemelmans (1898-1962) (www.madeline.com), a painter, illustrator, and writer for both children and adults, originally published Madeline in 1939. It lives on today, along with Caldecott Medal winner Madeline’s Rescue, as a seminal picture book in children’s literature. Ludwig Bemelmans’ grandson, John Bemelmans Marciano, carries on his grandfather’s legacy and has written and illustrated four books about Madeline of his own, including Madeline and the Old House in Parisand Madeline at the White House.


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Madeline — At Travelnitch, we create opportunities for shared learning, so parents and children can explore the world together.

We deliver new and exciting experiences to encourage dialogue and provoke curiosity. For that reason, we have three primary goals: – Strengthen the bond between parent and child through a shared love of travel. – Forge a more meaningful connection between kids and the world around them. – Promote creative learning to inspire a lifelong passion for exploration.

Madeline

Travel plays such an important role in our lives. It has the ability to change us for the better. It’s an experiential education that teaches us how to feel, think, act, and react in positive ways. Travel fosters creativity, builds confidence, and teaches us all to be more tolerant. My own kids benefit from travel every time we hit the open road. No amount of money can buy those life lessons.

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