Dance Like a Geisha

geisha

At Travelnitch, we create opportunities for shared learning, so parents and children can explore the world together.

We deliver new and exciting experiences to encourage dialogue and provoke curiosity. For that reason, we have three primary goals: – Strengthen the bond between parent and child through a shared love of travel. – Forge a more meaningful connection between kids and the world around them. – Promote creative learning to inspire a lifelong passion for exploration.

dance like a geisha

Travel plays such an important role in our lives. It has the ability to change us for the better. It’s an experiential education that teaches us how to feel, think, act, and react in positive ways. Travel fosters creativity, builds confidence, and teaches us all to be more tolerant. My own kids benefit from travel every time we hit the open road. No amount of money can buy those life lessons.

Travelnitch is inspiring the next generation of explorers. We believe travel is a wonderful way to ignite the imagination and get kids excited about the world. However, we need your help to make this possible. Please spread the word and support our efforts to raise citizens of the world. Let’s go on this adventure together!

Become a Virtual Explorer

Join your instructor for a virtual dance lesson and learn the graceful art of Nihon Buyo, a Japanese style of dance traditionally performed by Geisha. Connect with a classically-trained Japanese dancer on Zoom for an unforgettable experience in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere.

Note: This virtual tour runs on Eastern Standard Time (EST)


What is a Geisha?

Geisha (芸者) are traditional female Japanese entertainers, skilled in various Japanese arts, like music and dance. The term geisha is best translated as “artist.” They are very respected in Japanese culture and becoming one requires many years of training.

Those who study to become a geisha are called maiko, which means “dancing child.” The women seen in the picture below, wearing brightly colored kimonos and white makeup, are likely to fall into this category. More experienced geisha don much simpler garbs and only wear makeup for special occasions.

In the 1920s there were more than 80,000 geisha in Japan. While they still exist today, their numbers are far less—only an estimated 1-2,000 can be found now, primarily in Kyoto and Tokyo.

Young girls who wish to train often begin in high school or college, becoming well-versed in traditional Japanese music, dance, tea ceremony, dressing and makeup. A geisha not only studies art, she must become a work of art herself.

Discover even more of our virtual tours and escape the boredom of being stuck at home!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *